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Click here to download the current issue of the Bay Leaf, the East Bay Chapter newsletter, in pdf format.

Dear Friend of the Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tour,

This is nearly the last call!

If you have not yet registered, but would like to receive a garden guide in the mail (80 pages, color photos, $10) you must register by this Saturday, April 29.  After Saturday, no more garden guides will be mailed.

If you have not yet registered, but would prefer the free PDF over the printed garden guide, you should register soon, and download the files as soon as possible, to ensure everything works as it should.  There will be no one to help you on the day of the Tour.

If you have already registered and signed up to receive the PDF, you will already have received the e-mail that contains the link.  Please download the files now to ensure you can access them.

If you have decided you would rather have the printed garden guide than use the PDF, just reregister and purchase the guide with your PayPal account or credit card.

Not sure whether or not you have registered?  Search your in- and spam-box for a confirmation e-mail from Kathy@KathyKramerconsulting.net.

Native Plant Extravaganza – On the weekend of May 6 and 7, during the Tour’s Native Plant Sale Extravaganza, a number of native plant nurseries will be open from 10:00—5:00.  Native plants will also be sold at select gardens on Sunday, May 7, the day of the Tour. Check the website for details.

There is still room in the upcoming “How to install a drip irrigation system, and get paid for it, too!” workshop:

Saturday, May 20, 10:00–3:00 El Cerrito

“How to install a drip irrigation system, lower your water bill, and get paid for it, too!, led by Kim Titus of the Urban Farmer, Kelly Marshall of Kelly Marshall Garden Design, and Kathy Kramer of the Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tour

Read the full description and register for this workshop here.

Over the next week and a half a number of this year’s Tour gardens will be featured on the Garden Tour’s Facebook page; visit it to see lists of gardens with plant sales, gardens where you can meet the designers, gardens with music, art, or children’s activities, the best bird gardens, gardens with oak woodlands, rain gardens, local native plant gardens, and more. “Like” and “share” these posts to help promote the Tour.

Applications for the 2018 Tour are being accepted.  Garden visits will begin in May, and end in July.  Please send in your application and plant list now if you are interested in offering your garden for the Sunday, May 6, 2018 Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tour.

I hope to see you on the Tour this year!
Kathy Kramer
Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tour Coordinator
(510) 236-9558
kathy@kathykramerconsulting.net
www.bringingbackthenatives.net
Visit the Garden Tour on Facebook

I hope you enjoy this article as much as I have:
The Chickadees Guide to Gardening: In Your Garden, Choose Plants That Help the Environment

Registration for the Thirteenth Annual Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tourwhich will take place on Sunday, May 7, 2017 from 10:00 to 5:00, is ending soon; register now to ensure your place, and to purchase a garden guide.

This award-winning tour features forty Alameda and Contra Costa county gardens that are pesticide-free, water conserving, provide habitat for wildlife, and contain 60% or more native plants.  This self-drive tour showcases a variety of gardens, from wooded lots in the hills to small parcels in the flats. Native plant sales and talks are offered at select gardens.

More than fifty talks will be offered on the week-end of the Tour!  Music will be performed at various gardens; children’s activities will be offered at two, and nature-related art will be available for sale at two more.

Companion events: The Native Plant Extravaganza will take throughout the weekend of May 6 and 7.

Workshops will take place throughout the year.

Click here for a calendar of East Bay Chapter events.

Visit the website of the state organization of the California Native Plant Society to find out  about ways you can enjoy and protect our state’s native flora.

Coast silk tassel (Garrya elliptica) and flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum). Photo by Delia Taylor.
Flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum). Photo by Delia Taylor.

 

Hound’s tongue (Cynoglossum grande). Photo by Delia Taylor.

Western leatherwood (Dirca occidentalis). Photo by Delia Taylor.

 

Toyon, Christmas berry (Hetermomeles arbutifolia). Photo by Delia Taylor.
Toyon, Christmas berry (Hetermomeles arbutifolia). Photo by Delia Taylor.
Madia elegans, called common madia, is an annual, one of the tarweeds, and is in the Sunflower family. This plant was purchased at Native Here Nursery. Common Madia is different from a sunflower in that it closes up when the sun is out. But it glows on foggy Berkeley days. It readily reseeds, grows larger if there is water, stays small is there is little water. Photo and caption by Dellia Taylor.
Madia elegans, called common madia, is an annual, one of the tarweeds, and is in the Sunflower family. This plant was purchased at Native Here Nursery. Common madia is different from a sunflower in that it closes up when the sun is out. But it glows on foggy Berkeley days. It readily reseeds, grows larger if there is water, stays small if there is little water.
Photo and caption by Delia Taylor.

If you have a question having to do with how to use the site  or if you would like to comment on the website email me at webmaster@ebcnps.org .

From time to time I shall suggest a page for the reader to check out, for no other reason than that I have enjoyed it and suspect that others will also. I would like to recommend Easy Hikes, a selection of do-it-yourself field trips chosen and described by Bill Hunt, a photographer and hiker who has long been active in our Chapter as well as state CNPS in positions of leadership.

Check out the Easy hikes page.

Joe Willingham
East Bay Chapter webmaster

webmaster@ebcnps.org

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Madia elegans. Photo by Delia Taylor.
Madia elegans. Photo by Delia Taylor.