Field Trips

Monday, December 25, 2017, 10:00 am to 2:00 pm, manzanitas, toyon, at Mt. Diablo, end of Regency Drive, 117 Regency Drive, Clayton.  At Mount Diablo, Hetherington Loop is gorgeous this time of year. We should see big berry manzanita in flower, and toyon in fruit. If we are lucky, we might get to see crystal clear Donner Creek during a high flow. We will take Donner Canyon Road, and Hetherington loop trail. Round trip distance is 3 miles, elevation gain is 350 ft.

If there has been a lot of rain wear appropriate footwear, since it can get very muddy on this walk. Bring lunch and water. Meet at the end of Regency Drive in Clayton.

Directions: Take 24 or 680 to Ygnacio Valley Road. Continue on Ygnacio Valley Road into the city of Clayton and turn right onto Clayton Road. Take Clayton Road past the first intersection with Marsh Creek Road. In about a mile it becomes Marsh Creek Road. Continue straight on Marsh Creek Road. Turn right on Regency Drive. Go to the end of Regency. Do not turn onto Rialto Drive; that is for a different trail.

Gregg Weber
Co-organizer

Sunday, January 7, 2018, 2:00 pm, field trip to Huddart County Park to see fetid adder’s tongue
Location: Huddart County Park, 1100 Kings Mountain Road, Woodside (San Mateo County) California

Meet in the parking lot just past the pay station. David Margolies (510-393-1858 cell, divaricatum@gmail.com) will lead a hike on the Crystal Springs Trail where fetid adder’s tongue (Scoliopus bigelovii, Liliaceae) usually blooms in early January. (In most locations outside botanical gardens it blooms in late January or early February. We have seen it here almost every year except 2013 and 2016.) This is a gentle trail, losing about 200 feet over about 1/2 mile to the creek. We will walk to the creek and then return the same way. It is unlikely that there will be any other flowers out this early, but the fetid adder’s tongue’s presence tells us that the new flower season has started.

Plants out of flower will also be identified. The area is second growth redwood and mixed evergreen forest.

David Margolies